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David, 22, fled from South Sudan to Uganda in 2014. Now he’s studying computer science and plans to go to university in Kampala to pursue his dream of becoming an engineer.

Young people who have been forced to flee often struggle to get the education and training they need. Only 3 per cent of young refugees have access to education after finishing school, compared to 36 per cent of young people across the world.

David is one of the lucky ones. A resident of Nyumanzi refugee settlement, he completed high school at a local school in Uganda. He went on to enrol on a computer science course run by the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) in partnership with Arizona State University (ASU).

David fled from South-Sudan ti Uganda in 2014. He completed high school at a local school in Uganda. He as now finished the online training course and a waiting for his enrolment at the University in Kampala. David is dreaming of doing an exchange year in either the United Kingdom or the United States. He want to pursue a carrier in software engineering to secure his future.

Only 3% of refugee youth have access to tertiary education, compared to 36% of the world’s youth. While a growing number of programmes provide tertiary education opportunities to refugees through scholarships and distance education these are few and with little documentation about processes and outcomes. The partnership between. Arizona State University (ASU) and Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) is a direct response to this need.

In August 2018, ASU and NRC signed a Memorandum of Understanding to establish an ASU Earned Admission programme at Ayilo and Nyumanzi refugee camps in Adjumani District, Uganda. The programme provides students with access to online courses through the university’s Global Freshman Academy.

25 South Sudanese and Ugandan learners participated in the programme. 40% are female and the makeup of the group otherwise reflects the importance of working hand-in-hand with the host community.

Location: Youth Center in Nyumanzi Settelment, Adjumani, Uganda 
Photo: Ingrid Prestetun/NRC

“The computer skills training course has opened many possibilities,” says David. Photo: Ingrid Prestetun/NRC

Dream of becoming an engineer

“The computer skills training course has opened many possibilities,” he says. “I am now enrolling in university. It is very important to have that certificate.”

David has big plans for his home country of South Sudan – a nation still plagued by violence despite achieving independence in 2011.

“My country is not stable in terms of security,” he explains. “There are no good structures or infrastructures. I have a dream of becoming an engineer. We will be the ones to build our country.”

Adau (24) fled from South-Sudan in 2014 with her mother and sister. She was out of school for five years but have now completed the online training course. She is waiting for her enrolment at the Kampala University. Adau is dreaming of pursuing a carrier in social network.

Only 3% of refugee youth have access to tertiary education, compared to 36% of the world’s youth. While a growing number of programmes provide tertiary education opportunities to refugees through scholarships and distance education these are few and with little documentation about processes and outcomes. The partnership between. Arizona State University (ASU) and Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) is a direct response to this need.

In August 2018, ASU and NRC signed a Memorandum of Understanding to establish an ASU Earned Admission programme at Ayilo and Nyumanzi refugee camps in Adjumani District, Uganda. The programme provides students with access to online courses through the university’s Global Freshman Academy.

25 South Sudanese and Ugandan learners participated in the programme. 40% are female and the makeup of the group otherwise reflects the importance of working hand-in-hand with the host community.

Location: Youth Center in Nyumanzi Settelment, Adjumani, Uganda 
Photo: Ingrid Prestetun/NRC

“I want to do computer science,” says Adau, 24, after completing NRC’s training course. Photo: Ingrid Prestetun/NRC

Adau, 24, fled from South Sudan in 2014, together with her mother and sister. She was out of school for five years but has now completed NRC’s computing training course and hopes to study at Kampala University.

“Education is important to me because it is the key of life,” she explains.

Like David, Adau wants to work towards a brighter future for her home country.

“After my studies, I want to go back to South Sudan and help to build the country,” she says.

“I want to do computer science. Without technology the country can’t become perfect. You protect the country by using networking and technology.”

 

A growing demand

The course has proved highly popular among the young people of Nyumanzi settlement.

“It is a course that the young people are very interested in,” explains Ulrika Blom, country director for NRC Uganda. “We have more applications, more youth that want to participate than we can actually provide for.”

“By investing in skills opportunities for young people, we help them to grow and fulfil their dreams.”

For David, the course is a vital stepping-stone on his educational journey. “If we finish successfully,” he says, “then we will be able to change our country.”

Source https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=https://www.nrc.no/perspectives/2020/we-will-be-the-ones-to-build-our-country/&ct=ga&cd=CAIyGjVjYWMzMDRkNTczNGIxNjg6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNEnlUeV5y7HLQ_GI2JtxoOOyynenw

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